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Friday, October 9, 2020 | History

5 edition of HLA in narcolepsy found in the catalog.

HLA in narcolepsy

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Published by Springer-Verlag in Berlin, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Narcolepsy -- Genetic aspects -- Congresses.,
  • HLA histocompatibility antigens -- Congresses.,
  • HLA Antigens -- immunology -- congresses.,
  • Narcolepsy -- immunology -- congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementY. Honda, T. Juji (eds.).
    ContributionsHonda, Y. 1929-, Juji, T. 1935-, International Symposium on Narcolepsy (2nd : 1985 : Stanford University)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC549 .H57 1988
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 208 p. :
    Number of Pages208
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2036146M
    ISBN 100387189564
    LC Control Number88012312

    Hello Select your address Best Sellers Prime Video Today's Deals Books Help New Releases Home & Garden Gift Ideas Electronics Gift Cards & Top Up Vouchers PC Sell Free Delivery Shopper Toolkit Prime Video Today's Deals Books Help New Releases Home & Garden Gift Ideas Electronics Gift Cards & Top Up Vouchers PC Sell Free Delivery ShopperManufacturer: Springer. Genetic markers for narcolepsy have been identified. HLA DQB is the most specific HLA marker associated with narcolepsy across all ethnic groups; however, this haplotype is neither sufficient nor necessary for the diagnosis of narcolepsy.

    A version of the HLA-DQB1 gene called HLA-DQB1* increases the risk of developing the sleep disorder narcolepsy, particularly in people who also have cataplexy. (Cataplexy is a sudden loss of muscle tone in response to strong emotion, such as laughing, surprise, or anger.) It is unclear how HLA-DQB1* causes this elevated risk. However, there is increasing evidence that narcolepsy is.   Certain individuals may inherit a genetic susceptibility to narcolepsy, but not all will go on to develop the disorder. The search for other genetic factors involved in human narcolepsy has led scientists to a group of genes known as the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex, which perform a central role in the immune system.

    The primary genetic factor that has been strongly implicated in the development of narcolepsy involves an area of chromosome 6 known as the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex. [13] [16] Specific variations in HLA genes are strongly correlated with the presence of narcolepsy; [13] however, these variations are not required for the condition to occur and sometimes occur in individuals without . Genetic factors play a key role in the development of narcolepsy. 8 Up to 98% of patients with narcolepsy have the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene variant HLA-DQB1*, compared with 12% to 38% of the general population. 1,8 In a recent study that analyzed blood samples from individuals with narcolepsy, autoreactive CD4+ memory T cells that target self-antigens expressed by hypocretin.


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HLA in narcolepsy Download PDF EPUB FB2

The close relationship between the HLA antigens, hitherto considered as immune-related genetic markers encoded by genes HLA in narcolepsy book human chromosome 6, and narcolepsy appeared to open a new approach not only for the research of narcolepsy but also for the mechanism of sleep in : Hardcover.

Buy HLA in Narcolepsy: Read Kindle Store Reviews - HLA in Narcolepsy - Kindle edition by Yutaka Honda, Takeo Juji. Professional & Technical Kindle eBooks @ The close relationship between the HLA antigens, hitherto considered as immune-related genetic markers encoded by genes on human chromosome 6, and narcolepsy appeared to open a new approach not only for the research of narcolepsy but also for the mechanism of sleep in general.

Honda Y, Doi Y, Juji T, Satake M (b) Narcolepsy and HLA: positive DR2 as a prerequisite for the development of narcolepsy.

Folia Psychiatr Neurol Jpn Google Scholar Honda Y, Harada S, Someya T, Juji T, Matsuki K, Naohara T, Satake M () HLA-DR2 and Dw2 in narcolepsy and other DOES without by: HLA antigens in narcolepsy and idiopathic central nervous system hypersomnolence.

Poirier G, Montplaisir J, Décary F, Momège D, Lebrun A. Several studies have shown familial incidence of narcolepsy and idiopathiccentral nervous system (CNS) hypersomnia. HLA antigen studies performed inmongoloid and caucasoid narcoleptic patients on the A, B, and C loci have yieldedconflicting results.

In parallel with novel familial instances, which have HLA in narcolepsy book typically presented narcolepsy as part of a syndrome, only four HLA DQB1*negative narcolepsy cases with low CSF hypocretin-1 (≤ pg/mL) have been reported.

2,3,29,38 –40 To further understand this rare phenotype, we gathered a case series from four centers, and conducted exome sequencing and full HLA class I and II typing. THE HLA SYSTEMAND NARCOLEPSY The immune system distinguishes self-antigens from foreign antigens through the cell surface expression of the highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex(MHC)anMHCsystemiscalledtheHLA system and its genes map to the short arm of chromosome 6 (6p) (Figure 1).

MHC class II alleles and narcolepsy susceptibility. HLA alleles strongly influence the development of narcolepsy. Poirer G, Montplaisir J, Decary F, Momege D, Lebrun A () HLA antigens in narcolepsy and idiopathic nervous system hypersomnolence. Sleep 9: – Google Scholar Seignalet J () Recherche d’anticorps anti-cellules B et typage HLA-DR à Montpellier.

Narcolepsy is a multigenic environmentally influenced neurologic sleep disorder affecting to % of the population. Among other genetic regions, it is associated with the HLA class II region of the HLA complex.

HLA-DQ6 and/or HLA-DR15 confer susceptibility to Narcolepsy, with variable relative risk according to ethnicity. Familial cases of narcolepsy in the United Kingdom have been known for a considerable time (Barraitser and Parkes ), but the genetic factors involved have in the past, been uncertain.

In however, Langdon et al. showed that the HLA system provided a strong. HLA in Narcolepsy. [Yutaka Honda; Takeo Juji] -- The latest findings on the extraordinarily strong association between HLA-DR2, Dw2, DPwl and narcolepsy are here thoroughly documented.

Recent observations on immunological aspects, DNA typings and. Because DQB1* is present in the normal population, no test for an HLA gene constitutes a test for narcolepsy. A more reliable approach would be to consider that, in an appropriate patient who has cataplexy, the absence of the strongly associated DQB1*, provides good evidence that the patient does not have narcolepsy.

NARC: Narcolepsy is a neurological condition affecting about % of African American, Caucasian, and Japanese individuals. It is characterized by excessive daytime somnolence and abnormal rapid eye movement (REM) sleep.

Cataplexy (weakness precipitated by emotions, especially laughter) is present in 64% to 79% of patients with narcolepsy. Genre/Form: Conference papers and proceedings Congress Congresses: Additional Physical Format: Online version: HLA in narcolepsy. Berlin ; New York: Springer-Verlag, ©   Mignot et al.

demonstrated that HLA-DQB1* is associated with shortened REM latency, increased sleep efficiency, and decreased stage 1 sleep in normal subjects. 39 Similar to our results, Hong et al. revealed shorter sleep latencies, higher ESS scores, and more severe cataplexy symptoms in narcolepsy with cataplexy patients according to HLA-DQB1* status.

40 However, an. Juji T, Satake M, Honda Y, Doi Y () HLA antigens in Japanese patients with narcolepsy: all the patients were DR2 positive. Tissue Antigens – PubMed CrossRef Google Scholar Kessler S, Guilleminault C, Dement WC () A family study of 50 REM narcoleptics. Most people with narcolepsy have the HLA-DQB1* variation, and many also have specific versions of other, closely related HLA genes.

It is unclear how these genetic changes influence the risk of developing the condition. Variations in several additional genes have also.

All patients were HLA-DR2-antigen positive and had the same HLA-DR2 subtype. Clinical severity of disease was not correlated with HLA-DR2 heterozygosity or (putative) homozygosity.

This study confirms that the extremely high association between HLA-DR2 and narcolepsy holds across comparisons of the three races studied to date when both clinical. The gene most commonly associated with narcolepsy is called HLA-DQB1. HLA-DQB1 encodes a component of the human leukocyte antigen complex, which is an important part of the immune system.

Narcolepsy with cataplexy is genetically associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele DQB1*, suggesting the involvement of the immune system. It is also characterized by a 90–95% loss of hypocretin neurons. A small portion of cases of narcolepsy without cataplexy are also HLA positive and hypocretin deficient.Complex HLA-DQ genetic effects, with HLA-DQB1* homozygotes (84) and DQB1*/DQB1* (65) carrying the highest relative risks for narcolepsy susceptibility were reported.

These data, paralleling those observed in other HLA associated diseases, suggested that HLA-DQ itself rather than an unknown gene in the MHC region was the.By far major genetic susceptibility determinants of narcolepsy, as in other autoimmune disorders, are found within the HLA region.

7,8 Among HLA class II genes, the DRB1*DQA1*DQB1* is the disease-associated haplotype in narcolepsy.

In European populations, the three alleles of this haplotype are in complete linkage.